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SELECTED HIGHLIGHTS
Project Syndicate Jun 2002 Looking beyond the tribalism taboo.
"Africa has long suffered under the belief that passionate tribal attachments are inefficient, irresponsible, and inhumane..." Read more
Practioner Persective: E-commerce from Ghana
E-Marketing by Judy Strauss, Adel El-Ansary & Raymond Frost. Prentice Hall "Although eShopAfrica.com is based in Ghana but marketing to the rest of the world so the fact that credit cards are hardly used in Africa doesn't affect us. "Read more
AITEC 2003 Conference, Accra, Ghana Ecommerce in Africa - Making it Happen
"Since the early days of the Internet we've been hearing how ecommerce is going to change the way Africa does business..." Read more
Africa: Continent of Economic Opportunity by David Fick Read the article
Disasters Vol 10, No 3, 1986: The International Journal of Disaster Studies and Practice, Research and Development Institute Towards an Early Warning System in Sudan
"Since 1983 successive years of drought in part of Sudan have caused famine conditions, social disruptions and widespread health problems." Read more
BBC Focus on Africa Magazine, Jan-Mar 2005 Kofridua Bead Market
"Kofridua, a regional town about an hour outside the Ghanaian capital, Accra, is famous all over West Africa for its bead market." Read more
Bead Society of Great Britain Fight Hunger Beads
"Fighthunger.org is a division of the United Nations World Food Programme which has been set up to help end child hunger by 2015 which is part of the Millenium Development Goals" Read more

eShopAfrica media

In 2000 I founded eShopAfrica.com, a fair trade ecommerce site creating sustainable businesses for traditional African artisans. Some of the media coverage is below - there is more on the eShopAfrica blog. You can also check out the Facebook page

Silicon Africa: Africa e-commerce: Beyond the Hype, Feb 2013
The oldest and most successful African eCommerce company is eShopAfrica.com, from Ghana, started in 2001, selling arts and crafts from Ghana, Ethiopia, Zimbabwe and Mali to consumers in USA, and UK. See the article
African Business Review: Making money online in Africa through e-commerce, Jul 2011
eShopAfrica.com is one of the oldest e-commerce businesses in sub-Saharan Africa. This fair trade market for traditionally produced arts and crafts from Ghana, Ethopia, Zimbabwe and Mali started trading online in 2001. The company has grown into a sustainable business while still maintaining traditional supply chain dynamics. See the article
Beers of the World: Coffin Clever, April-May 07
This edition of Beers of the World magazine our beer coffins scored a hit. The piece reminds us that Homer Simpson dreams of being buried in a beer coffin - Homer - eShopAfrica can make your dream come true! See the article
Santa Clara University Global Social Benefit Incubator
eShopAfrica was selected to join the Class of 2005
National Geographic: African Crafts, Sep 2005
This Ghana based fair trade website helps African craftspeople build their businesses by offering products ranging from kente cloth and other textiles to custom-made coffins. Profits help pay for education and health care. See the article
Fortune Small Business: Coffins to Die For, Feb 05
In Ghana what you do in life determines the style of your burial. The Ga tribe, located in the country's capital Accra, models coffins to reflect their occupants hobbies and occupations from peacocks for bird lovers to airplanes for pilots. Now five-year-old exporter eShopAfrica.com is giving the burial vessels new life above ground in the living rooms of Europe and America. See the article
Playboy: Fatal Distraction - Going out in Style, Jun 04
Crazy caskets cheer up the grimmest of reapers. If you sell shoes for a living, you may as well step into the hereafter in a giant wingtip. At least that's the thinking in Ghana, where a coffin is the last word in style. See the article
FHM Magazine: Coffins - Getaway Caskets, Jun 04
All the fun of a funeral in Ghana without ever having to live there. No-one knows where we go when we die. If it's LA though, you're going to need a set of wheels. Thanks to coffin-makers in Ghana, the dead can now take to the afterlife in a hand-carved Ferrari, Subaru or whatever they fancy.See the article
BBC website: African Crafts go Online, Feb 03
Traditional African craftsmen are starting to sell their wares to collectors on the other side of the globe, thanks to..." Read more
BBC Top Gear Magazine: Box-sters, Mar 03 -
A few A few years ago, we featured the carpenters in Accra who create bespoke conveyances for that final journey. The lion used to be the most respected coffin, but the symbol of choice is now... See the article
Boating Magazine: Boating for Eternity, Oct 03
We know boating is your life - obviously - so spend the hereafter in a coffin built to resemble your boat. Morbid? Yes. Better than anything your family will pick out for you? Absolutely. See the article
Zunia Knowledge Exchange: Handicraft E-Commerce Projects Cited As Model E-Business Success Stories, 2003
rom Africa to Argentina, case studies of handicrafts groups using the Internet for sales and marketing are showcased this month as some of the leading “success stories” for small enterprise e-business worldwide. At the World Bank’s Development Marketplace (Dec. 3-4 2003... See the article
Wall Street Journal: Ghana's Tech Frontier, Internet Start-Up Flourishes, 2002
...A business called eShopAfrica.com (www.eShopAfrica.com) sells Africana online. Products include hand-carved Ga coffins that are shaped like airplanes, shoes and howitzers, all designed to reflect the earthly interests of the recently deceased....
See the article
Sweatshops and Butterflies: Cultural Ecology on The Edge, 2001
Michael North and Paul Swider, Greenstar Corporation for the British journal Sustainable Development International
eShopAfrica.com exports arts from Africa, to help traditional artisans make a decent living. Young people move to the towns, but end up unemployed or homeless because they don't have urban skills. eShopAfrica puts money and prestige back into their lives, building the value of their traditional skills. Visit the page